Dialogue Magazine

Volume 12, Issue 3, 2016

Articles addressing different aspects of opioid prescribing: Function is Key, New Requirements for Fentanyl Patches, Dangers of Abrupt Cessation, and Naloxone Availability an Opportunity for Discussions; and The Newest Disposition – Remedial Agreements

Oct 12, 2016

Full edition available here

Features

In this issue, we have several articles addressing different aspects of opioid prescribing:

Function is Key

When it comes to monitoring your patients who are on opioids, pay very close attention to the function scores, says two physicians who recently made presentations about opioid prescribing to the College.

New Requirements for Fentanyl Patches

New legislation aims to make it more difficult for patients to abuse or divert their fentanyl patches. The legislation requires physicians and pharmacists to make changes to the prescribing and dispensing process for fentanyl. The regulatory colleges for both professions have developed a fact sheet to provide guidance.

Dangers of Abrupt Cessation

There may be unintended harms while reducing opioid prescribing to safer levels. Particularly, rapid tapers and abrupt cessation of opioids can cause patients serious harm, including risk of overdose if they resume opioids again.

Naloxone Availability an Opportunity for Discussions

The recently expanded availability of naloxone provides an opportunity for doctors to re-visit a discussion about overdose with their patients who may be at higher risk.

The Newest Disposition – Remedial Agreements

The Inquiries, Complaints and Reports Committee may now suggest remedial agreements in those low risk cases where minor educational needs are identified. We explain more in a Q&A.